media AND news

MEDIA

Hurricane Ian's Long Term Environmental Damage Underscores the Value of EcoVAP’s Wastewater Elimination Ability
November 2022
Following Florida’s hurricane Ian, the clean-up continues, but some contamination from overflowing wastewater storage and evaporation ponds is likely to lead to toxic soil and freshwater for years to come. Florida and much of the Southeast US have a difficult wastewater problem given a plethora of industries that need to dispose of toxic waste and wastewater (including phosphates and various mining, farming, livestock, paper, concrete, asphalt, metal and many other industries) vs. few safe means for disposal (i.e., few injection wells, and ocean dumping is illegal for most industries). Thus, the state relies on thousands of storage, treatment and evaporation ponds that overflow during torrential rains and with toxins that can be carried by winds for hundreds of miles. EcoVAP’s ability to reduce wastewater volume by >95%, without using practically any energy or land, is ideally suited to be a low-cost, environmentally-friendly means of reducing or eliminating these toxic ponds and lagoons. Despite Florida’s high humidity, EcoVAP has proven its ability to evaporate at >25x the normal rate even during the state’s cooler, humid months.
Unchecked Oil and Gas Wastewater Threatens California Groundwater
October 2022
California is the only US state that still allows untreated oil and gas “produced water” to be dumped into unlined pits. This article details increasing evidence that produced water toxins are showing up in drinking water, including benzene levels that are 45x California’s legal limit. In total, the state produces 3bn barrels of produced water a year, adding to an existing 16 billion barrels of previously disposed water that continues to “percolate" into groundwater. EcoVAP operates a large facility in California, but in the mining sector (see Case Studies), and hopes to similarly dewater >95% of produced water.
US "Carpet Capital" Facing Legal Action for PFAS Disposal
September 2022
Residents of Rome, Georgia are asking courts to halt dumping of upstream carpet dye wastewaters that cannot be treated by most traditional municipal sewage systems. Dalton Georgia produces ~90% of the US’ carpet, which is made out of synthetic fibers that are dyed with many “emerging contaminant” and difficult-to-treat chemicals. This water flows downstream to Rome after being semi-treated by plants that were never designed for these ultra-small contaminants. One such chemical is PFAS, thought to be a carcinogen, and which is very difficult to separate from wastewater due to its small size. Even when separated, this “forever chemical” can only be destroyed via an incinerator at ~1,800F. Some of these carpet companies have already settled with the plaintiffs, agreeing to send their water to a hazardous waste facility (see second article), presumably at much higher cost. EcoVAP’s ability to reduce this wastewater volume by >90% could dramatically reduce this cost.
EcoVAP Records Highest Evaporation Rate to Date, 63x Pan Rate, at BGNDRF Test Facility
June 2022
OREM, Utah--(BUSINESS WIRE)--EcoVAP, Inc. is proud to announce the first results of a pilot-scale EcoVAP Evaporation Matrix at the Brackish Groundwater National Desalination Research Facility (“BGNDRF”) in Alamogordo, New Mexico. The project is being partly financed by the Bureau of Reclamation (“Reclamation”) based on EcoVAP winning a grant to dispose of excess brine water in the lowest cost and most environmentally-friendly way possible.
US Supreme Court Decision in Hawaii Has Broad Implications for Injection Well Disposal
April 2022
A recent ruling by the US Supreme Court on the breadth of the Clean Water Act (1972) is expected to have significant precedent-setting implications for all wastewater injection wells. The Clean Water Act prohibits the polluting of water bodies beyond the pre-existing pollution level, and requires getting a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (“NPDES”) permit before disposing of wastewater. The law specifies that it applies to all direct and indirect water bodies that might be affected, with “indirect” being those that have a “significant nexus” or “navigable waters” from where the wastewater is disposed. Thus, injection wells, which mainly use underground holes and porous rock, were mostly exempt from this regulation. However, Justice Stephen Breyer argued that “navigable waters” should include the “indirect” contamination of seepage and flows from underground pathways, as is often the case, and thus that the “discharge of polluted water into the ground, rather than directly into nearby waterways, does not relieve an industry of complying with the Clean Water Act." Despite this decision being focused on a relatively small (Hawaii’s Maui Island) case, and on sewage (as opposed to many other wastewaters that use injection well disposal), the ruling is expected to have broad implications for all injection disposal including produced water (from oil/gas) and other mining and industrial wastewaters that are targeted by EcoVAP.
West Texas Shale Companies Could End Up Paying Up to $207-$763mn to Transport Water from Seismic Zones
January 2022
In response to a 88x increase since 2018 in >3 Richter scale earthquakes in the Permian, Texas regulators are imposing restrictions that can shut-down or sharply curtail the volumes of certain saltwater injection wells (“SWDs”). As a result, transportation costs to ever more distant and less seismicity-dangerous SWDs could lead West Texas Shale E+P costs to increase by $207mn (currently contemplated curtailments/shutdowns) and as much as $763mn (assuming curtailments and shut-downs of all of the SWDs in the earthquake-prone areas). As an enhanced evaporation company, EcoVAP carries no seismicity risk, and is generally able to evaporate with 1/40th the land footprint and lower costs than conventional evaporation. Moreover, because EcoVAP’s Evaporation Matrices are fully scalable to any wastewater disposal need, they can be located at the well-head or tank battery, thus implying no trucking. EcoVAP already operates one such facility in the Eagle Ford (See Case Study: https://www.ecovap.com/case-studies/oil-gas-operation)
EcoVAP’s Dramatic Impact on Reducing C02 Footprint
January 2022
The attached report “The Carbon Footprint of Water” estimates the water sector consumes a whopping 13% of all electricity in the US and is responsible for 5% of all US carbon emissions. Moreover, these figures are expected to rise dramatically given that new water supplies must come from even more energy-demanding sources; i.e., pumping through longer aqueducts and from deeper aquifers, and from desalination and other treatments for reuse. By contrast, EcoVAP’s biomimcry-based technology uses practically no electricity, thus implying negligible CO2 footprint, and our “Matrices” can also be located at the point where the wastewater is generated, thus avoiding the CO2 from trucking.
Study: Toxic Fracking Waste is Leaking into California Groundwater
November 2021
California is facing “massive” groundwater contamination due to the practice of dumping wastewater into "percolation pits," being the last state in the US that allows dumping into these unlined ponds. The amount of water being disposed of this way is increasing rapidly: in 2019, there was nearly 3 billion barrels of produced water generated by the oil/gas sector, or roughly 18 barrels per barrel of oil produced, having more than doubled from the 8bbls per barrel of oil registered 20 years ago. There are 1,850 produced water ponds in California’s Tulare Basin alone, and to date regulators and corporates have generally concluded that the cost of the clean-up of legacy contamination is excessive - even while the dumping of 16bbls/year into the percolation ponds continues. These percolation ponds and “spray-fields” allow toxins to either seep into underground aquifers or flow into rivers and aqueducts when it rains. In one case, the carcinogen benzene was found at 45x the safety limit for drinking water.
Permian: Increasing Earthquake Clusters Lead to Renewed Regulatory Interest
October 2021
Predictably, the recent recovery Permian basin E+P activity has also led to increasing SWD volumes and earthquake “clusters". This has lead to more stringent regulations on the Texas side of the basin that are expected to affect 76 facilities. On the western side, New Mexico regulators are also considering a variety of measure to reduce earthquake risk.
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska