April 5, 2021

ECOVAP Advantages Toward ZLD Summarized

ECOVAP Advantages Toward ZLD Summarized

April 5, 2021

The Bureau of Reclamation (BoR) published a January 2021 report titled “Emerging Technologies for High Recovery Processing” that includes a summary of ECOVAP’s capabilities as an environmentally-friendly enhanced evaporation technology (p. 124). The report was part of the BoR’s “Desalination and Water Purification Research Program” which scans the world for new, disruptive technologies that will desalinate and/or otherwise purify contaminated water. ECOVAP’s value-add in this process is in reducing the extraordinary volumes of brine and other wastewater concentrate effluents that come from reverse osmosis and other filtration processes. The volume of this wastewater is staggering, and has been a significant cost and environmental limitation on the build-out of in-land brackish water desalination plants, for example. ECOVAP can reduce these volumes by >90% with little energy, no chemicals, and very little land footprint. (full story)

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WASHINGTON POST
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Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
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WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska
WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 2021
Army Corps denies permit for massive gold mine proposed near Bristol Bay in Alaska